Stock Split

An increase in the number of shares of a corporation's stock without a change in the shareholders' equity. Companies often split shares of their stock to make them more affordable to investors. Unlike issuing new shares, a stock split does not dilute the ownership interests of existing shareholders. For example, if you own 100 shares of a company that trades at $100 per share and the company declares a two-for-one stock split, you will own 200 shares at $50 per share immediately after the split. If the company pays a dividend, your dividends paid per share also will fall proportionately.